,

What I know about Germans

Cultural differences and specifics are a never ending source of amazement, mystification and amusement in international work environments such as ours. Luckily many expats today cope with their cultural shock by blogging about it or posting hilariously funny posts in social networks – so people moving or traveling to a new country can check out what will await them.

deutschland-fahne-wehend

Cultural differences and specifics are a never ending source of amazement, mystification and amusement in international work environments such as ours. Luckily many expats today cope with their cultural shock by blogging about it or posting hilariously funny posts in social networks – so people moving or traveling to a new country can check out what will await them.

What_I_Konw_About_GermansOne of my favourite posts of German attributes was composed by Liv Hambrett, an Autralian writer in Germany. Here are some of my favourites from her never ending list:

  • Germans enjoy dairy products. The refrigerated sections of their supermarkets are homages to experimentations with yoghurt and quark. …
  • They are punctual. It’s in their genetic make-up. They cannot be late.
  • They are very good bike riders – nay, they are exceptional bike riders. They manage to look elegant while free-wheeling down cobbled streets, pashminas blowing out behind them. They are also highly adept at riding with umbrellas.
  • Thus, German kids learn to ride young. They start in small wagons attached to their parents’ bicycles and move through the ranks until, at 6 years old, they are fully fledged members of the cycling community.
  • Germans are thorough. They seem to live by the ‘do it once and do it well’ principle. They work hard and effectively, despite working some of the shortest hours in the western world.
  • They love a good boot.
  • And they never scuff them. Even when bike-riding down a cobbled street in the rain, holding the shopping and an umbrella, pulling a wagon behind them with a child contained within.
  • They do not suffer fools gladly, thus only put up with drunk Australians and Americans during Oktoberfest because we’ll pay hideous amounts of money for hideous amounts of beer.
  • Germans can drink. And not just write themselves off, vomit in the bath tub at 2am, wedge in a kebab and back it up the following night, a la American/English/Australian binge drinkers … but drink. While the rest of the world is vomiting in the bath tub, the Germans are calmly ingesting their 57th shot and washing it down with a beer, their cheeks a little rosy, their eyes a little glazed, but their livers working as smoothly as a German made automobile.
  • In fact, Germans hate small talk. Words without purpose are wasted words.
  • This is because Germans are generally extremely direct people. They do not see a need for conversational subtext. They say it as they see it, while keeping you at the appropriate arm’s length distance. Directness and distance are valued social commodities.
  • They may be the only people in the world to a) have a word for and b) accept the notion of ‘Frühjahresmüdigkeit‘ – ‘Spring time fatigue’.

For the full list please visit Liv’s blog.

Stay tuned for more insights into other countries from our international teams each Thursday.

WibkeSonderkamp

Author: Wibke Sonderkamp, Head of Operations, GlobalCom PR Network

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